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Mario AKA mark

Tattoo Critique

44 posts in this topic

It’s come up that critiques are a little too lenient on tattoos that need a little help. Here are some questions that need to be asked when analyzing a tattoo. You can even copy and paste these and use the subjects to answer how the person did or didn’t do well on a certain area on their piece.

This is far more professional then “ wow that’s awesome” or “ that sucks sell your shit on EBAY.”

Tattoo Critique:

Line work: does the artist seem to have grasped the technique of applying smooth consistent lines. Do they flow with no shakes, skips or scratchy places in the tattoo. Are the lines a full dark black where they need to be?

Fill: Are all color and black areas a consistent color with no light, overworked or inconsistent areas?

Shading: Does the tattoo show good gradients from light to dark and transition from color to color?

Color Harmony: Does the tattoo have colors that compliment each other not seeming too dark or light?

Position/Size: Does the tattoo seem to be the right size for the area; is it centered and lined up? Does it go with the flow of the body?

Over all composition:   What is your final feeling good or bad about the tattoo can it be improved or it a lost cause. How is the end result now that you have taken the piece apart?

This is what should be considered when critiquing a tattoo. If all of these are considered you can tell weather or not they succeeded. Take into consideration of subject matter and disregard that. Just because you hate skulls and butterflies doesn’t make it a bad tattoo.

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Excellent Post Mark !!!

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**applauds** that is after all why we post our works!!  ;D

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I have to agree with Mark.  Saying "I like it" or "good job" may make an individual feel good but does absolutely nothing to help them improve their work.  I would rather someone point out areas that need improving so I can make changes in my way of doing things so I don' *uck it up on the next tattoo.  Granted, most of the time its just a lack of practice or time needed to perfect one's style, but sometimes a person is going about it totally the wrong way and needs to be redirected.

Might want to consider renaming this forum to "Critique my work" or something along those lines or creating a whole new forum altogether just for critiqueing.

Another thought..... what if only "experienced" members do the critiqueing instead of the folks just learning this stuff.

Enough out of me......

Terry

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Great information for everyone Mark!  When I see the tatoo's posted the first thing I look at is the linework, after that I just analyze the whole thing for holidays and other things.  I think this would help people by telling them what they should improve on by pointing out key specifics.  Great post!

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I can see what you're saying, but I'm not entirely sure I totally agree.

I've been a manager at work for a few years now & I know from experience that criticism can be very demoralising.

For example if I gave an appraisal to one of my staff & spent an hour telling them how great they were doing, but them mentioned a couple of poor aspects of their work that need improving. The only thing they remember from the appraisal would be the criticism & you can just see the heads drop.

Secondly writing criticism is very difficult to do as it can be misconstrued very easily.

However, giving a "you're doing a great job, guys" every now and again is great for morale.

With that said, of course, constructive criticism is very helpful. Saying "good work, but you need to work on your outlining or shading" is all very well, but explaining how to improve on your outlining or shading would be far more insightful.

I also totally agree that if someone posts a new tattoo & it has shaky lines, poor fill etc, 20 "thumbs up" remarks is no good for the artist at all.

Anyway's that's my 2 cents wroth.

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Well hell sometime the truth hurts, and I don't mind, especially when someone gives me pointers to do better next time!  But I know not everyone is acceptable to criticism, so I can understand where your coming from. 

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k alvin i agree with you . however when dealing with a medium so closely judged by people . everything needs to be perfect.

alvin what you shouldnt do with your staff is typically labled "the crap sandwich" start your talk with good . put some criticism in the middle , then finish off with the good.

example - hey hows it going how was the weekend... ive noticed- need to start putting the labels on the tps reports ,what you didnt get the memo.... anyways your doing a great job. i like the way you.really happy to have you as part of the team.... 

this isnt very effective you need to have a positive approach through the whole process.. the crap sandwitch works only in office evironments/grocerie or department stores.

but in tattooing , you need to be able to tell someone something looks bad or else theyll stop learning and get big headed. fuck being nice.

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As someone starting out...you really do want honest constructive criticism to build your skills.  I think if you gotta ask, you're really asking for somone to "see what I  see".  Again as  a newb, I see every little mistake I make...call it --the artists' eye.  John or Jane Q public off the street will generally tell you your tat looks great (especially if you did it on yourself) becuse aren't thinking of all the diomensions that make a great tattoo.  If it's the bomb...you'll feel it.

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Mark, nice job! I am hopeful we'll see some more constructive feedback on our work.

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makes sence.....

oh and make sure u extend ur pinky wen typin ;D

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great....i didnt even know this was here.....good one mark

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agreed...

critique is good when truthful, and fair, but not cutting and nasty....

allowance to make comment as long as its all of the above is definitely agreeable... and in no way mean.

:D

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i agree that an honest critique is a good thing but to often i'm seein artists at a very beginning level bein the harshest critics. and often without posting any of their own work to be scrutinized. i respect certain peoples opinions immensely (like mark,gettattoo,jabbardstown,joe blow, etc.....)because they are at a high level of expertise and keep it honest. its kind of laughable though to me when a rookie artist who isn't doin quality work tries to rip apart work of a higher level than they themselves are capable of. anyone is capable of havin an opinion. a critique should be done by someone with some degree of skill (or at least by someone who is themselves subject to their work bein picked apart). talk is cheap and everyone's a critic.......to that i say put up or shut up. i can't respect an opinion of an unaccomplished artist really. what are they basin their opinions on? just my two cents and i could be way off base here............mark does make a good point though especially if the critique is based on the outlined criteria. i guess i just feel that not everyone is qualified to critique (my opinion)

Edited by tatboy69
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I do like the honest opinion of non artist for teh fact tattooa sre really for them and the brutal honest answers tend to help more but when you are in the buisness and being a dick with no proof that's when I get offended.

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I do like the honest opinion of non artist for teh fact tattooa sre really for them and the brutal honest answers tend to help more but when you are in the buisness and being a dick with no proof that's when I get offended.

i agree. and i do try to be open to peoples opinions , but i hate the competitive b.s. especially comin from someone who hasn't subjected their own works to scrutiny or is just not very good.........ahhhhh hell with it..rip me apart. it just means i won't make the same mistakes next time.

Edited by tatboy69
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I just think in an art like tattooing, which is permanent you should be judged against the best standards. Both in terms of artistic ability and execution. I loved it when Shorty gave me real feedback. Whether or not I agreed, I like hearing what others think I need work on.

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I just think in an art like tattooing, which is permanent you should be judged against the best standards. Both in terms of artistic ability and execution. I loved it when Shorty gave me real feedback. Whether or not I agreed, I like hearing what others think I need work on.

that's true i suppose . i guess even if i don't agree with the opinion its still good in the sense that the next time i do a piece i'll be thinkin about that particular criticism and will damn sure not make the same mistake again(if there was one). but i will continue to value some opinions far more than others........

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Well the thing is....unfortunantly, we as human beings, learn our best lessons from the worst mistakes, lol. That is the nature of US. I used to have a fabrication shop foreman that I had the utmost respect for, simply because , here this guy was, Army Ranger Vietnam vet, one of the best pipe welders I have ever seen (taught me hehe), well respected in the Church and highly thought of in his community....someone that anyone could see, as soon as you met him...had earned and deserved respect from everyone. Now ,even though he had great experience in welding practices, he had not done much sheet metal layout and design. When he took over in the shop, one of the first things he did was come over to me while I was laying out the dimensions to shear and brake a cone out of a sheet of 11ga. stainless and he said " Listen, I would like to watch you do that piece, but if you don't care, would you explain it as you go. I 've never done this type of work, let alone form a cone out of a flat sheet of metal." and he followed with "Explain it to me like I'm a 5 year old, you won't hurt my feelings lol...I'll take a baby aspirin and be all right in the mornin'!"

His outlook on life really influenced me, as at the time (some 15 years ago) I was still in that mode like alot of younger guys...that I felt like there was something wrong if I did'nt already know how to do something lol. Now if a fellow with a life background like this fella' can still be humble at his age, with ALL his accomplishments,( and there are many more that I learned over time),.....then why is it so hard for people to take critisism on something that they claim to have their HEART in doing. Yeah, you might not like what is told to you , if they're being honest but, how ELSE will you learn. there is nothing wrong with saying "I don't know how..."

Critiqueing should be TAKEN as another step in the right direction, and GIVEN as constructive and honest, other wise, whats the point?? I don't know if anyone has payed any attention to my little saying at the bottom of my posts but, it says "You are only as smart as the part of the world your standing in." He was the one who said that to me. Think about it thoroughly, makes alot of sense, and carries over into all things in life lol.

Peace Brothers R.

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Sounds like a wise man,

great idea to take a page from his book.

Good post man.

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i agree some people don' t take the time to really look at the work and critique properly and some are give people the idea that they're tattooing skills are good which are not this is a good post

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Well ,I , by no means intend to to try and make anyone think my stuff is up to par compared to alot of professional stuff out there, but I have been around tattooing most my life as my mother used to tattoo back when I was little fella', she used to tattoo all her biker friends and covered my stepfather.....she did alot of fantasy women and beasts....Frazetta type art.....only problem I later realized is, she did'nt do it in a shop enviroment like it should have been.....all home done and push needle.....her stuff always turned out great considering it was done like that....and she always tried to keep it clean....but with what I know now lol, alot more could and should have been done....but , hey! thats some of that ol' school tattooing history for ya'. But, again I make no claims to be the best or even GOOD for that matter, I just got back into all of it a couple of years ago and I'm workin' on it EVERY day, I either draw, read or tattoo every day. I only offer suggestions because I have spent the mojority of my life (40 yrs.) around tattoos or tattooing in some form or another......I know what a GOOD tattoo is suppose to look like, just cant quite get there yet myself LOL.

Peace Brothers R.

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