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Froth zones of a Flotation Equipment are different

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What is often a secondary consideration is whether the design is optimal from the point of view of recovering all of the different types of ore particles that are present. Consideration must be given to both the particle size and liberation distributions of the ore. Decades of research have shown that the basic mechanisms of particle collection in the pulp and froth zones of a Flotation Equipment are different based on size and liberation of the ore particles. As a result, using large vessels as roughers is a compromise since some ore particle types are recovered more efficiently at the expense of other types.
Initial study of the flotation concept was in the late 19th century. The basic process involves the selective coating of a particle's surface to alter or enhance its surface chemical characteristics. The flotation process is widely used for treating metallic and non-metallic ores.  A greater tonnage of ore is treated by flotation than by any other single process. Practically all the metallic minerals are being recovered by the flotation process and the range of nonmetallic minerals is steadily being enlarged.
Performing flotation within the grinding circuit has been successfully utilized by many concentrators across the globe for decades and has advantages including the reduced need for water, chemicals, and power when compared with the conventional style of flotation. The term “unit cell” is used to encompass all forms of flotation within the grinding circuit and includes both cyclone underflow and mill discharge (cyclone feed) flotation.
Limited resourse, unlimited science and technology. We are ahead of our peels because of our constant pursuit of technology. For more information, please visit this website: http://www.goldenmachine.net/product/flotation-equipment/

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