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Adela

How to: perfect lines in one go?

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Hello!

I was wondering, how do you make the ink catch so perfectly in one go as in this video? When I tattoo, even when I go really slow and deep enough, I have to go over the line several times to make it this pretty... why? what am I doing wrong?

 

Thank you!

 

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It’s all down to experience, something like this is way too intricate for a novice to try. Maybe your machines aren’t suiting your hand speed or they need tuned better to suit how you work. The video (I’m watching on an iPhone) looks like the tattooist is working off the tube so the lines are almost guaranteed to ‘be in’ and ‘stay in’ the skin, but as I said  , it all comes down to experience... the more you do , the easier it seems to get.

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37 minutes ago, mac_1au said:

It’s all down to experience, something like this is way too intricate for a novice to try. Maybe your machines aren’t suiting your hand speed or they need tuned better to suit how you work. The video (I’m watching on an iPhone) looks like the tattooist is working off the tube so the lines are almost guaranteed to ‘be in’ and ‘stay in’ the skin, but as I said  , it all comes down to experience... the more you do , the easier it seems to get.

Oh thank you!

I hope in time it will get better for me as well :)

BTW I am sorry to ask but english is not my mother tongue and I am still not used to the slang.. what exactly do you mean by "off the tube"?

 

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essentially

 the needle  sticks out of the end and you gauge the depth the needles are going in. best way to do it when you know how to tattoo

or you use the tip to guide the needle around so the needle is flush with the end of the tip and the tip is put against the skin and dragged around best way of you dont as you can set how deep the needles are going in and don't have to worry about blow outs 

 

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I am an apprentice at a shop right now and I’m having similar difficulty friend, you are not alone lol. I have an inkjecta and there are many combinations for the inkjecta setup. So far it seems like the best setup for linework is a short stroke 2.5-3mm and the rigid bar. As the others have said the most important thing seems to be experience. Needle depth is critical as well, and obviously it takes a lot of hands on experience to learn the different areas of the body and also each persons skin is slightly different. So try testing out the client’s skin in the areas with more room for error (spots where you will blow out less)

 

edit ; also your personal combination of hand speed and voltage 

Edited by WillowFrog

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20 hours ago, WillowFrog said:

I am an apprentice at a shop right now and I’m having similar difficulty friend, you are not alone lol. I have an inkjecta and there are many combinations for the inkjecta setup. So far it seems like the best setup for linework is a short stroke 2.5-3mm and the rigid bar. As the others have said the most important thing seems to be experience. Needle depth is critical as well, and obviously it takes a lot of hands on experience to learn the different areas of the body and also each persons skin is slightly different. So try testing out the client’s skin in the areas with more room for error (spots where you will blow out less)

 

edit ; also your personal combination of hand speed and voltage 

You should not be testing on a clients skin until  you are proficient and that is when your mentor tells you!! 

 

lesson for today!

for what reason does iit actually have anything to do with machine speed and hand speed ???

 

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1 hour ago, mark101 said:

You should not be testing on a clients skin until  you are proficient and that is when your mentor tells you!! 

 

lesson for today!

for what reason does iit actually have anything to do with machine speed and hand speed ???

 

Thank you for your input, I am practicing under my mentors guidance. I appreciate that you may do things differently. 

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15 minutes ago, WillowFrog said:

Thank you for your input, I am practicing under my mentors guidance. I appreciate that you may do things differently. 

Thats kind of what i said..

if your mentor says you are ready then they think you are ready lol 

 

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25 minutes ago, mark101 said:

Thats kind of what i said..

if your mentor says you are ready then they think you are ready lol 

 

Practicing on fake skin and pig skin can only give you some of the understanding of how to tattoo a real person, because real human skin involves stretching and angling your hand and body, and adjusting the needle depth to the skin region - if you tattoo on someone’s inner forearm or wrist the way you tattoo on the back, you’re in for a world of blow outs lol. Pig skin and fake skin also don’t get cut or damaged the same as live human skin

I work with a rotary machine so increasing voltage increases the speed of the needle striking the skin - speed also affects the momentum and force of the needle. If the machine is running too fast, the same portions of skin will be struck too many times too hard and can cause damage. Depth of the needle can also cause damage, and TYPE of needle can also cause damage if the needle grouping is tight combined with higher voltage (speed) 

That being said, the idea is to have the needle hitting at a speed that is non harmful, and moving your hand at a speed which can make sure the needle is able to deliver enough ink in an area to create a solid line, but not slow enough that the same place is hit too many times. Needle depth is also critical, too shallow of a line and perfect hand speed and voltage will still yield inconsistent lines. Too deep and obviously you get the joy of seeing a tiny black vein or area spread next to your line. 

My mentor informed me that the shorter stroke is better for lining because you can increase the speed of the needle strike, while making sure the force of each impact is not too much to damage the skin. A large stroke cam, combined with a higher voltage will cut the skin most likely because it is too strong of an impact for the small area of the needle tip. So small stroke will allow you to increase the speed high enough that you have a less chance of damaging the skin simply through the momentum of the needle.


*edit* note that 10 volts 2.5cam will hit much less hard but at the same speed compared to a 4.0 cam with 10 volts. 
 

Edited by WillowFrog

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