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    • J.J. Flash

      THIS IS A SITE FOR ARTISTS, NOT CLIENTS (Please read before posting)   04/18/2018

      I'm seeing a lot more questions from people who are looking to get tattoos, asking about ideas, healing instructions, etc. These are questions you should ask YOUR  LOCAL TATTOO ARTIST, not random people on the internet. This site is specifically for tattoo artists and those looking to get into the trade by way of an apprenticeship. Don't be shy! Google local artists and drop by a shop or two, check out their portfolio of work and talk about your ideas with a professional who can help you achieve the best tattoo experience. 

       Thanks for reading!

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Been tattooing for a couple years with the stealth rotary 3.0 from world wide tattoo supply...

I'm looking to upgrade... Maybe a coil or pen machine so I can try something new... Budget of 500$ plus

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated...

Ps I live in Canada 

Can see some of the work I've done on Instagram @thepsychopomp

Cheers

 

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Nothing beats a good dry humping 

not even a reach around first

Edited by mark101
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15 hours ago, mark101 said:

Nothing beats a good dry humping 

not even a reach around first

hmmm shit people on shit community?

is there a tattoo forum that actually gives advice? or just douche comments all around

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There's other tattoo forums out there? I thought we were the last group of douchebags on the last ghost town of an antiquated discussion format!!   We're douchebags basically of r the sake of amusing each other; and to see who's either got thin skin or a knack for the snake comeback.   (You're getting picked on for not introducing yourself prior to asking equipment questions). 

If you've been using a Stealth - or anything from WWTS, for that matter -  almost anything's going to be an upgrade.  I've been using John Clark's magnetic rotaries for a couple years now.  Dan Kubin's machines are great, as well.  Getting machines from both of these guys can be like winning the lottery, though, as they're hand made in small batches that sell out almost immediately.

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Most other.forums would probably fuck you off just for your attitude AND the fact that you seem to be a scratcher/kitchen magician. This forum is a bit different.....Im a coil user myself  but have had the good fortune to be sent a dan kubin mini cranker a few years ago to "test run" by one of the moderators on here,quality hand built machines if rotaries are.your thing,if its coils your after paco rollins is probably one of the best value for money everyday coil machines out there,if you feel the need to spend some serious coin you could get an aaron cain coil machine but you would need around 800.

 

 

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I could also build you one if you can show me a lisence

i can think off the bat at least 6 great machine builders from canada

but its an open forum so i wont say them here

 

Edited by mark101

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Thanks for the replies...

I did not have the opportunity to get an apprenticeship... So got a machine and practiced on myself( I don't see the harm in this).. What is the beef with "scratchers/kitchen magicians"? 

Now I have the time and money to start looking for an apprenticeship... Could any give any advice on how I can go about this... 

From what I understand... You just go from shop to shop... With some of the sketches you have and see if someone wants to teach you... And you get no money for your time there... 

Cheers

 

 

 

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Main concern with "scratchers" is their lack of hygiene.  Working out of your home doesn't necessarily define you as a scratcher.  Being a slob does.  

Cold calling for apprenticeships is never received well (unless you happen upon someone who churns out shitty apprenticeships for a lot of money).  Approaching the tattooer that does most of your work's usually a good way to go.

 I never did an apprenticeship.  I just researched the process and equipment; practiced on myself a LOT; took a blood born pathogens/cross contamination prevention course - then applied what I learned through that with extreme overkill;  then found some friends who volunteered for my first tattoos with a full understanding that I was without experience.  I was also acquainted with a few tattooers who considered me to be a competent artist and didn't mind giving me advice (also knowing full well that I was tattooing on my own).  After a few years of that, I started tattooing out of a shop. If you have a portfolio of good tattoos, you can pretty much bypass the apprenticeship stage.  That being said: learning on your own is a very slow learning process.  I'd have much rather been in a shop learning to tattoo.  

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Alot of the big names started out at home 

and they all say its a lot harder to do it that way and would suggest the correct route 

ask aaron cain, guy aitchison or bob tyrell how they started 

you can still tattoo from home legally in some places in the world  just do it the right way and get registered.

 

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You don’t want to bring sketches. You want to bring 12-15 fully finished rendered / colored drawings. You will want to show that you can do good linework and have some understanding on what makes for a good tattoo design. Use the vast information on the internet to research what makes a good tattoo design, and use some iconic type tattoo imagery. You don’t want drawings that are going to be impossible to translate into a tattoo - or if you do, make it just 1 or 2 drawings at most. 

I recently obtained a tattoo apprenticeship which quickly turned into being a full artist. I did exactly as i described above, went to every tattoo shop in a 20 mile radius to check it out, bringing my portfolio. Ask for advice on the direction for your art work and inform them you are wanting to learn to tattoo. It might just be a numbers game till you find a shop with space for an apprentice. 

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Thanks again for the feed back... This has been very informative.

I will find a blood born pathogens/cross contamination prevention course

And I will start to work on 10-15 fully finished drawings for my portfolio.

Now I had a couple more questions regarding the work I have done on my self...

In a select few places (mainly wrist area and top of hand) the ink is raised/bumpy... Why does this happen and how can I make sure it doesn't happen again?

Secondly I am having lots of trouble getting the ink to stay in my palm/fingers... some areas I blow out... And some areas the ink doesn't stay at all... 

Any tips for palm/finger area? Next time I go over it... I will try going slower and on more of an angle... 

Mmmmm... also when working with white ink... Does one have to rinse after everytime the needle goes in the skin... Cause I found if I don't, then white gets all pink-ish from my blood...

Any tips on using white ink would be greatly appreciated... I would like to highlight some teeth and what not on my sleeve.

Cheers

 

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