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newcoyote

Correcting color

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First of all, I am not an artist just a tattoo recipient. My knowledge is slim to none on the technical stuff. Yes, I will be talking to my artist (she has 10 years experience and has good reviews) about this concern too but I like to equip myself with as much info as possible from as many sources as I can. So I recently had some work done. The artist did a great job and I am happy overall. I let her design my job but I had a theme and elements I wanted to be included. It is a patriotic thing and one of the elements is the flag of British Columbia. This flag has blue stripes to represent the ocean. The color is important because it is...well my flag. The result of the finished tattoo is the blue is quite a bit different than what it should be. I am not angry at the artist at all because I understand there are variables at play like skin tone and who knows what else. Also she showed my the ink in the bottle (I believe the brand was Fusion) and it looked correct. Royal Blue. My question. Can this be corrected by going over it again and if so, how? 

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Can you post a photo?

A lot depends on skin tone, of course, but the color can be pushed around a little bit. Subtlety really only works on pale skin; so a slightly warmer or color blue will just show up as muddy on anybody with skin leaning towards olive or brown tones. And when it comes to pure, primary pigments, there are very few. All of the blues in a manufacture's color line are made from the same base blue, with the addition of white to lighten them and tiny amounts of red, yellow, green to get subtle tones. In darker skin anything other than basic blues (labeled dark, medium or light) is going to have a toning color in it that will make it appear darker or duller than expected when the skin heals over it.

Pigment manufacturers like to name their colors creatively, so the name on the label doesn't always help. The pigment ID numbers are sometimes listed on the bottle.  Clean colors will only have a max of two numbers: the base pigment and white. Going over a dark, warm blue with a clean, medium blue will brighten it up a bit; but the result will be somewhat random. 

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Wet ink will always look different when its dry in the skin.

try it yourself with paint on a piece of paper and let it dry andsee the difference

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