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Casanova

Spring Tension

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Can anyone explain to me what spring tension and throw actually mean? I know when I am taking apart and putting my machines back together how I want them to work and feel and if I have issues it is hard to research or explain when I do not understand machine language. I am studying at figuring out every technical name for the parts, I am blessed that my father has his masters in engineering and is able to explain to me scientifically what is happening with the currents ext, but when it come's down to the artistic aspects of tuning it and setting it up to work in different ways, that I've been on my own with and learning more about my machines, especially language would really help me. What does it mean if a machine does not have enough "throw"? Thanks guys!

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Throw is the distance your needle will move vertically. Spring tension is controlled by the thickness of your spring, length of your spring and upward bends of your spring. Different tensions are desirable for different setups.

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Okay I'm trying to put in mental pictures with what your saying. So if someone had too much throw and was riding their tubes than they could really be scarring people up? What is the significance of throw versus how far you hang your needle and control needle depth? Now to spring tension, is it a spring tension issue if I'm trying to single pass lines, on properly pulled skin and the needle sticks and stops the pass? Do o-rings increase spring tension or reduce it?

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if you mean stick in the skin i would assume it is your rear spring. dont quote me or anything im newer then you at this lol but being that the rear spring pulls the a-bar from the coils it sounds like it is to weak. what needle grouping are you using and spring gauge? again i could be wrong lol

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A liner that is tuned properly should be able to single pass, and just as you can make a a really solid line with a five liner you can pull a line looking like a 3 liner was used, I have had times when I didn't feel my liner was tuned right for me because I couldn't pull the lines that I wanted. I would have to "float" my needle so that my lines were being pulled very small, they looked like they were done with a 3 or single needle. To get the lines I wanted I would sculpt them but I prefer to single pass a lot of my line work. By stick I mean, its rolling smooth only at the very tip of the needle, and as I attempt to utilize more depth, it sticks, almost like it feels like it is not soft enough to ease through the skin unless its such a small hit of the needle. I'm not talking about cramming a five liner into the skin and blowing out or scarring people up, there are certainly reasonable depths but one should be able to utilize their liner with a 5rl and be able to single pass lines that look bold and be able to single pass lines with that same liner that look like a 3rl was used. Here is an example, you know those yellow bic pencils with the twist bottom that has one single piece of lead in it? when you push on it, you still get a smooth flow through your paper, because of the spring, but when I try to utilize the five liner for a bold line, ill get a stick to where it just doesn't allow me to roll, its unforgiving unless its the slightest tip of needle. Comparing it to those pencils I really feel like it has to do with spring tension, like perhaps to much tension is going on with my liner. To me it doesn't spring back like it should when it gets "stuck" instead of smoothly gliding it sticks and jumps from its place to where I can't pull the lines I want and end up having to sculpt them. That is a common problem I have faced in the past. I am getting better at adjusting my machines to work as I want them, but insight to this issue would truly help me. When I put my finger on the end of the armature bar to feel how the needle would hit, if I can't put a certain amount of force onto the bar without it continuing to hit than I feel like it won't let me single pass, at the same time though, that force has to be soft enough to not be pounding them but springy enough to roll in and out at the depths I want.

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In addition to this, I am quick at single passing my lines. I'm trying to master tuning my liner to where it allows me to single pass quickly, if it's not quick enough then I'll have lines incomplete with just a few hits the needle had time to pack pigment in and I need my machine to continue to softly roll through depths I control with the force I apply for bold lines or lines I want smaller.

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Slower hand speed or faster machine. And be wary that your not losing concentration and letting your machine tilt too much, thats just a recipe for needle sticking.The kylin machine you have should run pretty fast as they all seem to do,maybe change out the springs to get it running how you want.

Mac

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This is what I was getting at in the power supply post. You will probably learn way more about how your machines run and work from buying good machines. Try a couple different machines made by good builders. See which work for you and figure out why they run the way you like them. I don't tune or tear apart any of my machines when I get them. I buy them from good builders that make quality stuff and use their own machines. The most I do is file a contact screw and turn in the contact screw a little as needed or replace a broken or worn spring. But if you have quality machines there is no need to rip them apart and replace parts unless its due to wear and use. Even springs can last decades if taken care of properly.. I know how I like my machines to run but I could never build something to run as good as Seth cifferri or tge other builders that make my machines so why waste my time trying when I can be spending my time tattooing instead. Please don't confuse this for not knowing how to assemble a machine or set one up and how to tune one when I respring it. This is more in relation to post about swapping out springs sizes and lengths to affect the speed, throw and hit. If you buy quality machines you don't have to upgrade parts like that.

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This is what I was getting at in the power supply post. You will probably learn way more about how your machines run and work from buying good machines. Try a couple different machines made by good builders. See which work for you and figure out why they run the way you like them. I don't tune or tear apart any of my machines when I get them. I buy them from good builders that make quality stuff and use their own machines. The most I do is file a contact screw and turn in the contact screw a little as needed or replace a broken or worn spring. But if you have quality machines there is no need to rip them apart and replace parts unless its due to wear and use. Even springs can last decades if taken care of properly.. I know how I like my machines to run but I could never build something to run as good as Seth cifferri or tge other builders that make my machines so why waste my time trying when I can be spending my time tattooing instead. Please don't confuse this for not knowing how to assemble a machine or set one up and how to tune one when I respring it. This is more in relation to post about swapping out springs sizes and lengths to affect the speed, throw and hit. If you buy quality machines you don't have to upgrade parts like that.

I feel you on that, it's definitely worth it to have a machine that you don't have to do much work to, at least something one can put trust of quality into, I'm just saying that it helps to keep at it and work towards bettering ones knowledge, as Seth cifferri had to earn his knowledge somehow, I think diving into the engine till it makes one sweat will truly run the vehicle. Just a metaphor to help explain. Righteous advice and I will do what I can to upgrade my gear and limit my hassles to projects outside of what I have to get to work for me daily. Thank you :)

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Spring tension (most important is the rear tattoo machine spring) - Think of a diving board... would you rather run to the end of a diving board and jump up and land back on the board for that (bounce) then jump up again to the water - on a stiff diving board or a flexable diving board? (There is no right answer).

Spring tension - Front spring: Imagine you are on a swing set swinging away... someone puts a brick wall in front of you. You stop yourself with your feet. Now imagine the wall is gone - and replaced with a flexible sheet of rubber. Now imagine that your legs are the front binding post and the wall and rubber are the front spring. It is designed to take impact of the recoil. caused by the rear spring and coil magnets.

Throw: Imagine the distance between your legs and the brick wall (except you can bend your knees a bit upon impact) - the distance is increased-just a bit.

This is the Arm bar's "reach" to include flex on recoil..

Hope that was not too confusing..

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