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Having A Go At A Portrait

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Hi, this is just a pic of my rug rat's that I have been attempting to sketch. It's the first time iv tried a portrait, it's not finished, but I thought I'd post it anyway. I have been using the Drawing for Dummies book and found it very good, I would recommend it to anybody who like me saw art as a fuck about at school. Its got various exercises and tips to help you, but sometimes its good to get pointers from people, so please point, in the right direction, help defining the edge without making it sharp looking and getting enough shading to show texture but keep light things light, etc, etc. Dont just say it's shit because I know that and dont worry i'm never going to try and tattoo a portrait, full respect must be given to anybody who can do a GOOD portrait tattoo. ;)

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Go darker. Facial features appear a bit flat. As Kilowatt said: aim to f**k it up and treat it like something you're gonna throw in the bin afterwards. Then you won't be afraid of going too dark and probably nail the tones ;)

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Go darker. Facial features appear a bit flat. As Kilowatt said: aim to f**k it up and treat it like something you're gonna throw in the bin afterwards. Then you won't be afraid of going too dark and probably nail the tones :)

Just for the record, This is a risky tip I offered up. It works well for me, but it might not work well for others. It all depends on how you look at it and how you interpret the "tip."

This is a good beginning, keep going and start building up the values. Its hard to crit this at this phase because so much of the form will rely completely on your values which aren't there yet. Looking forward to the update!!

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thanks for the advice :)

this may seem a weird question, but do you think that, bearing in mind that you can't undo whatever you lay down with a tattoo machine. That it would be worth practising doing some sketches but not allowing myself to use an eraser or guide etc, on anything other than the guide lines that would be laid down as blood lines in a tattoo?

I suppose using differing lead thickness (if using a mechcanical pencil) would also sort of replicate using different needle groups, i.e., 3mm 5mm and 7mm etc.

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Well, achieving something on paper is totally different than skin. Completely different technique all together. When you're tattooing realism, you'd have to be mindful of this fact and understanding that its a different medium. Just like you can't erase with paint, its a different technique of applying the medium.

Like with the different size mm pencil being different needle groupings, they may resemble one another, but they act completely different and even the same pencils in someone elses hands can have a completely different effect. It may be a 7mm pencil, but that 7mm point can be worked in several different ways. So to even compare 1 pencil in one's hand to the same exact pencil in another's hand could bare the difference of night and day. Therefor comparing a pencil to a needle would have an even larger set of differences. Manipulating the point of the pencil is a large factor of the tool which you can't do with a needle. The needle has a consistency which you have to work harder to maintain on a pencil.

IMO, I wouldn't worry too much about the tattoo aspect of portraits until you're completely comfortable with general portrait work. Once you have a good grip on your portraits, a lot of your questions will already have been answered.

The guide lines would be your stencil. If you make your stencil stuff or buy it, you'll have a stencil that won't come off and you won't need to blood line much, if anything. But again, everyone is different.

The bottom line is, 2 different mediums which will have 2 different end results and are approached in 2 different ways for different reasons.

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On 7/6/2010 at 3:04 PM, Kilowatt said:

Well, achieving something on paper is totally different than skin. Completely different technique all together. When you're tattooing realism, you'd have to be mindful of this fact and understanding that its a different medium. Just like you can't erase with paint, its a different technique of applying the medium.

Like with the different size mm pencil being different needle groupings, they may resemble one another, but they act completely different and even the same pencils in someone elses hands can have a completely different effect. It may be a 7mm pencil, but that 7mm point can be worked in several different ways. So to even compare 1 pencil in one's hand to the same exact pencil in another's hand could bare the difference of night and day. Therefor comparing a pencil to a needle would have an even larger set of differences. Manipulating the point of the pencil is a large factor of the tool which you can't do with a needle. The needle has a consistency which you have to work harder to maintain on a pencil.

IMO, I wouldn't worry too much about the tattoo aspect of portraits until you're completely comfortable with general portrait work. Once you have a good grip on your portraits, a lot of your questions will already have been answered.

The guide lines would be your stencil. If you make your stencil stuff or buy it, you'll have a stencil that won't come off and you won't need to blood line much, if anything. But again, everyone is different.

The bottom line is, 2 different mediums which will have 2 different end results and are approached in 2 different ways for different reasons.

I've long wondered how I draw portraits would transition into a tattoo since I tend to shade and erase to achieve my lines and in tattooing there's no erasing. Thank you for this insight 

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