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David

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Everything posted by David

  1. If you can't come up with an appropriate design, don't force it. Some of the worst tattoos are a result of, "I want to add on to this..." Not all tattoos qualify as a work in progress. Want a sleeve? Plan a sleeve, and get to work on the there arm.
  2. Greywash inks to try out.

    Waverly Bluebird for wash. Waverly Dark Black for dark fucking black
  3. Rose Flashwork

    much better!
  4. is my tattoo healing properly?

    Same tattooer as your previous tattoos? Sounds like he just didn't go deep enough. The common concern is that dark skin may scar more easily than lighter. If this is a new guy, maybe he just doesn't get too much time working on dark skin.
  5. Rose Flashwork

    needs more contrast. Highlights and deep shadows. As it is, everything's just grey
  6. Having a hard time tattooing darker skin tones.

    darker skin tends to scar easily. If it'd their first tattoo, all you can do is ask them how they heal: do they get thick or dark scars from minor cuts? If they do have tattoos, see if they healed with any raised areas. If so, do the tattoo in a few sessions with as light an application as possible.
  7. Meet Shroomy :)

    welcome to the forum
  8. colour on brown skin (indian origin)

    Darker skin = stick with clean colors and be aware that they will heal significantly muted. So if there's going to be green on your tattoo, the tattooer will probably use a bright green that will heal looking like a darker, leaf/olive green. Yellows look mustard, reds look like brick (relatively)
  9. Holding the Machine

    I swing the machine around every which way; so the exact positioning of the grip in your hand won't really matter once you're working out an actual design. Whatever helps you keep the tip stable without applying a death grip is the right way to do it.
  10. Correcting color

    Can you post a photo? A lot depends on skin tone, of course, but the color can be pushed around a little bit. Subtlety really only works on pale skin; so a slightly warmer or color blue will just show up as muddy on anybody with skin leaning towards olive or brown tones. And when it comes to pure, primary pigments, there are very few. All of the blues in a manufacture's color line are made from the same base blue, with the addition of white to lighten them and tiny amounts of red, yellow, green to get subtle tones. In darker skin anything other than basic blues (labeled dark, medium or light) is going to have a toning color in it that will make it appear darker or duller than expected when the skin heals over it. Pigment manufacturers like to name their colors creatively, so the name on the label doesn't always help. The pigment ID numbers are sometimes listed on the bottle. Clean colors will only have a max of two numbers: the base pigment and white. Going over a dark, warm blue with a clean, medium blue will brighten it up a bit; but the result will be somewhat random.
  11. neck scars vs tattoos

    Not enough "awww, you poor thing" from us, I believe. Not everyone can grow a decent beard, Mac. You may have upset him with that.
  12. Ideas to complete tattoo

    Start over on the other arm. Want a half sleeve? Plan for a half sleeve. More lightbulbs sounds about right to me, as nothing else readily "goes" with that. Maybe have all of those paint splotches evolve into a bunch of little somethings. Kind of like the "black feather turning into little bird silhouettes" tattoo... that one's a classic!
  13. I've had difficulties tattooing someone who was taking medication for acne. His skin welted up and damaged very easily. And I react badly to tattoo pigment. All of my tattoos scabbed badly regardless of how or where they were applied or what type of aftercare I attempted. They were also very uncomfortable during the healing process - feeling like a bad sunburn for up to a month. As far as I know, you won't know if you're allergic to the pigment until it's under your skin.
  14. Bruce Lee tribute piece

    So this is a tattoo you applied, and an unfortunately poor application. The shading on the body is no good, but some of it's fixable. Looks like you're working with three tones: black, medium and skin. There's no actual shading on the body to show form, just an attempt to show the striations in the muscles with one grey tone and an 8 round. The other shading is jet black; giving him the world's skinniest foreshortened forearm and a wonky floating drop shadow under his fist. When it heals, the calligraphy background is going to show the thin outline in some spots when it should be "line-less" to appear as brushwork. First lesson in Tribal 101 is don't leave a gap between your outline and your fill.
  15. Hero tattoo help

    A stack of books makes for a pretty static design. And bland as well since they'd have to be huge to make the names on the spines legible. If you're looking to avoid basic portraits of these people, find an image that represents the heroic character of each person. One bit of advice that's repeated here, often, is to find a tattooer who you want to do the work and heed their opinion on what would work best.
  16. Bruce Lee tribute piece

    you're work; or on you?
  17. neck scars vs tattoos

    turtleneck under a sports jacket could be a game changer
  18. Healing advice

    What did you do for your chest tattoo?
  19. New to Forum

    Yup, welcome back to the small, quiet forum. 4 or 5, not including the occasional question asker who posts once then is never heard from again.
  20. Tattoo Collector

    welcome to the forum
  21. Any kind of busy background is going to compete with the texture of the feathers. No matter what is placed in the background, you'll still have two straight lines crossing over the hawk's head. Turning this into a color piece would be helpful. What was the original plan with this one?
  22. I use a phone. I get a deposit. No call no show? I buy lunch with their deposit and they can fuck off. No app needed
  23. How long does a stencil last?

    Absolutely!
  24. portrait

    Will there be a round 2? Looks kid you could go darker on the shadow side of the nose, chin, and wrist
  25. How long does a stencil last?

    Do you mean print/trace it today and put it on skin the next? Yes. When I used to hand-copy my stencils, I'd prep them in advance (sometimes a couple copies, in case it was a tricky application). I usually used them within a few days. If you mean to put the stencil on the skin, then tattoo it the next day: no. Even though the set stencil may survive to the next day, prepping the skin properly for tattooing will more than likely completely remove it.
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